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2020 Scholars Series: Thomas MacLaren, Walter Farquhar Douglas, and Thompson Duncan Hetherington: The Continuity and Evolution of Arts & Crafts Architecture in Colorado Springs

In celebration of museum’s groundbreaking Cultural Crossroads exhibit (opening November 2020), the 2020 Scholars Series will promote the latest academic scholarship to foster a new understanding of Pikes Peak Regional history.

Thomas MacLaren, Walter Farquhar Douglas, and Thompson Duncan Hetherington: The Continuity and Evolution of Arts & Crafts Architecture in Colorado Springs

Presented by Barry Binder

As young men beginning their training in the 1870s, the Scottish architects Thomas MacLaren, Walter Farquhar Douglas, and Thompson Duncan Hetherington were thrust into a profession responding to a new approach to art that would become known as the Arts and Crafts Movement. As migrants in a new land, indeed a newly settled land, MacLaren, Douglas, and Hetherington carried with them an adherence to the design principles and philosophies they had embraced in Britain, the cradle of the Arts and Crafts Movement. What resulted was the design and construction of commercial, residential, and ecclesiastic structures in Colorado Springs that were as authentic and unique as any American city could boast at the turn of the 20th century. This presentation will explore the lives of MacLaren, Douglas, and Hetherington, and the legacy of their work in the Pikes Peak region.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Barry C. Binder is an MA student in the Department of History at the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs. His area of concentration is modern U.S. and the American West, with thematic focuses on migration, labor, cultural, and social history. His current research centers on the transmission and evolution of ideas and identity through migration in the Pikes Peak region. He earned his BA in History from Illinois State University (’96), with a focus on regional, immigrant, and cultural history. In addition to academic pursuits, Barry is active in public history and historic preservation, serving as a Commissioner on the Historic Preservation Board of Colorado Springs and as a member of the Historic Preservation Alliance of Colorado Springs.

LECTURE – Creative Placemaking: 20 Years of Art on the Streets

Pikes Peak Regional History Lecture Series

Creative Placemaking: 20 Years of Art on the Streets

Presented by Claire Swinford

A lively, informative stroll through the history of Colorado Springs’ beloved Downtown public art program through the eyes of its friends, founders and current facilitators. Learn how a simple sculpture exhibit helped this community reconnect, revitalize and take pride in what makes their city center unlike any other.

Photo by Bryan Oller

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Claire Swinford is the Director of Urban Engagement for Downtown Partnership, the lead nonprofit organization ensuring that Downtown Colorado Springs serves as the economic, cultural, and civic heart of the city. She is responsible for activities of the State-Certified Creative District of Downtown Colorado Springs, public benefit programs and events of the Partnership, and growing stakeholder engagement within the urban core. She is the 2016 recipient of the Mayor’s Young Leader Award in Creative Industries, and was named a Rising Star by the Pikes Peak Arts Council for her cultural advocacy as well as her work as a painter.

LECTURE: Indigenous In Plain Sight

Indigenous In Plain Sight

Presented by Gregg Deal

Photo by Adam Williams/Humanitou

To be Indigenous in the modern day is a daunting, if not completely silent task. Few know what that means, and the Indigenous existence has little context to it for most Americans. Gregg Deal has a unique story of these concepts, coupled with his own life’s work as an artist, an activist and critical thinker.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Gregg Deal (Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe) is a provocative contemporary artist who challenges Western perceptions of Indigenous people, touching on issues of race, history and stereotypes. Through his work—paintings, murals, performance art, filmmaking and spoken word—Deal critically examines issues and tells stories of decolonization and appropriation that affect Indian country. Deal’s activism exists in his art, as well as his participation in political movements.

LECTURE – Worcestershire and Whiskey: The Archaeology of General Palmer’s Garbage

Pikes Peak Regional History Lecture Series

Worcestershire and Whiskey: The Archaeology of General Palmer’s Garbage

Presented by Matt Mayberry and Anna Cordova

In the Fall of 2016, construction work in and along the Camp Creek drainage in Garden of the Gods Park led to the discovery of two archaeological sites.  These sites turned out to be the area where garbage from General Palmer’s estate was disposed of throughout his entire occupation at Glen Eyrie.  The City’s archaeologist was able to use specific artifacts found on these sites to connect them definitively with General Palmer and his estate.  Because a large detention pond was slated to be built in the area of the sites, certain federal laws required testing, excavation, and other mitigation measures be carried out before construction could begin.  A formal excavation was conducted in October and November of 2018, and over 60,000 artifacts were recovered.  While analysis of these artifacts is still ongoing, we have learned much about the Palmer Estate, and we will continue to add to the story of our city’s founder.  Many of these artifacts will on display at the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum in the new exhibit “Evidence: Finding the Facts about General William Jackson Palmer” scheduled to open on Saturday, September 14.

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS

Matt Mayberry has served as the director of the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum since 2002. He holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in history. He has published scholarly and popular articles on a variety of topics, ranging from tuberculosis treatment in the Pikes Peak region to how museums can effectively use eBay to further their missions. In addition to his duties at the CSPM, Matt is involved with numerous boards and commissions and volunteers for the American Alliance of Museums to help similar institutions around the country to evaluate their performance relative to established standards of excellence.

Anna Cordova, Lead Archaeologist with the City of Colorado Springs, is the City’s first archaeologist.  Colorado Springs native and graduate of UCCS, she has been conducting professional archaeology for 15 years.  Cordova has archaeological experience in several states, with most of her experience in Colorado and Hawaii.  Her main focus as archaeologist for Colorado Springs is to protect and preserve archaeological resources on our park properties.

2020 Scholars Series: The Historic Films of the Pikes Peak Region

In celebration of museum’s groundbreaking Cultural Crossroads exhibit (opening November 2020), the 2020 Scholars Series will promote the latest academic scholarship to foster a new understanding of Pikes Peak Regional history.

This program features the historic films housed in the Special Collections of the Pikes Peak Library District and were shot in Colorado Springs in the past 120 years.  Colorado Springs has a rich history of films produced in the city because of the scenic beauty of the area which made for a natural backdrop for filmmakers. From the first film shot in 1897 by the Edison Film Company to the various films and commercials shot by the Alexander Film Company, this program will feature clips of these important historic films.  This program will also include personal stories from Steve Antonuccio’s book “There is No Such Thing as a Typical Librarian.”

About the Presenter

Steve Antonuccio retired from the Pikes Peak Library District in 2008 and helped acquire the collection of historic films for the Pikes Peak Library during his 20 year career managing the Library Channel.  He wrote an academic paper on the Alexander Film Company for the Pikes Peak Regional History Symposium in 2012.  He also published a book in 2019 on his career working in libraries entitled “There Is No Such Thing as a Typical Librarian.”

Gift of History Fundraising Breakfast

2020 Scholars Series: Five Decades of Women’s Suffrage in Colorado: Commemoration of the Centennial Anniversary of the 19th Amendment

In celebration of museum’s groundbreaking Cultural Crossroads exhibit (opening November 2020), the 2020 Scholars Series will promote the latest academic scholarship to foster a new understanding of Pikes Peak Regional history.

Five Decades of Women’s Suffrage in Colorado: Commemoration of the Centennial Anniversary of the 19th Amendment

Presented by Chris Nichols, Katherine Sturdevant, Leah Davis Witherow

2020 Scholars Series: Controversy and Compromise in Colorado Pioneer Monuments

“Follow the Setting Sun” – Photo by Cynthia Prescott

In celebration of museum’s groundbreaking Cultural Crossroads exhibit (opening November 2020), the 2020 Scholars Series will promote the latest academic scholarship to foster a new understanding of Pikes Peak Regional history.

In 1911, Denverites opposed plans for a Pioneer Monument featuring a Plains Indian warrior towering over white settlers. A century later, Colorado Springs residents rejected a conventional covered wagon monument in favor of a modern design celebrating cultural inclusivity. Cynthia Prescott will recount 100 years of pioneer monument controversies in Colorado, and then invite you to walk outside and view the statues outside the Pioneers Museum with new eyes.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Cynthia Culver Prescott is associate professor of history at the University of North Dakota. Prescott is the author of Pioneer Mother Monuments: Constructing Cultural Memory (University of Oklahoma Press, 2019) and Gender and Generation on the Far Western Frontier (University of Arizona, 2007). Her website, Pioneer Monuments in the American West [pioneermonuments.net], features interactive maps and timelines featuring more than 200 monuments. Supported by a Whiting Foundation Public Engagement Seed Grant, she is using the GIS-enabled app Clio to create detailed historical entries and walking tours of 200 sites in the West, with an emphasis on controversial public monuments and shifting representations of race and gender.

LECTURE: Marshall Sprague: Controversial Feature-Writer “Historian” to Our Town, Our State, Our West

Pikes Peak Regional History Lecture Series

Marshall Sprague: Controversial Feature-Writer “Historian” to Our Town, Our State, Our West

Journalist-author Marshall Sprague is a “colorful character” in the history of his own chosen town. His popular history of the town remains the book most likely offered to newcomers, to the discomfort of scholars. During most of his era here, it seems no popular or scholarly author superseded Marshall Sprague’s production of local/regional history books, articles, public lectures, or publicity generally about this place. Yet, researchers have not mobbed to his archives at PPLD or CC Tutt Library Special Collections. Viewing Sprague and his work anew might tell us as much about ourselves as it does about Sprague.

 

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Katherine Scott Sturdevant, Pikes Peak Community College senior history professor, has long taught, presented, written, and practiced public history. This presentation expands and further interprets her talk and chapter for this year’s Regional History Series of the Pikes Peak Library District Special Collections.

MUSEUM CLOSED

The museum is closed in observation of the Independence Day holiday.

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